Sunday, August 14, 2016

High Carbohydrate Intake Worse than High Fat for Blood Lipids

High Carbohydrate Intake Worse than High Fat for Blood Lipids:

Recent data presented at the World Heart Federation’s World Congress of Cardiology & Cardiovascular Health 2016 (WCC 2016) in Mexico City last month may radically change our perspective on how carbohydrates and different types of fats affect blood cholesterol and other lipid biomarkers. The presentation was based on data from the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiological (PURE) study. The data have not been published yet, and the results are only available in an abstract

[...]

In the above study, the only benefit of a high carbohydrate diet was a lowering of TC and LDL-C. However, the effect on other lipid biomarkers such as HDL-C, TG, and ApoB/ApoA ratio may be harmful.

A diet rich in SFAs raised TC and LDL-C but lowered TG while a diet rich in MUFAs improved all lipid biomarkers. A diet high in PUFAs had a mixed effect on lipid biomarkers.

The study suggests that placing carbohydrates at the bottom of the food pyramid based on their effect on blood cholesterol was a mistake. In fact, the data show that replacing dietary carbohydrates with different types of fat may improve lipid profile.

In an interview on Medscape, Dr. Mahshid Dehghan, the principal author of the abstract said (3):

To summarize our findings, the most adverse effect on blood lipids is from carbohydrates; the most benefit is from consumption of monounsaturated fatty acids; and the effect of saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids are mixed. I believe this is a big message that we can give because we are confusing people with a low-fat diet and all the complications of total fat consumption, and WHO and AHA all suggest 55% to 60% of energy from carbohydrates.

Today, most experts agree that diets high in SFAs or refined carbohydrates are not be recommended for the prevention of heart disease. However, it appears that carbohydrates are likely to cause a greater metabolic damage than SFAs in the rapidly growing population of people with metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity and insulin resistance.

I assume we all agree that partially hydrogenated fats (trans-fats) should be avoided. However, the singular focus on reducing the intake of SFAs, and dietary fats in general, may have been counterproductive and promoted the rapidly growing popularity of refined carbohydrates. The recent nutritional data from the PURE study clearly suggest that it is time to shift our focus away from reducing fat in our diet toward reduced consumption of carbohydrates.

Saturday, June 11, 2016

Strong statin-diabetes link seen in large study -- ScienceDaily

Strong statin-diabetes link seen in large study -- ScienceDaily:



Veterans Affairs Research Communications
Summary:
In a study of nearly 26,000 beneficiaries of Tricare, the military health system, those taking statin drugs to control their cholesterol were 87 percent more likely to develop diabetes. The research confirms past findings on the link between the widely prescribed drugs and diabetes risk. But it is among the first to show the connection in a relatively healthy group of people. The study included only people who at baseline were free of heart disease, diabetes, and other severe chronic disease.

Contradictions and Cognitive Dissonance: The (Kevin) Hall Effect - The Blog of Michael R. Eades, M.D.

Contradictions and Cognitive Dissonance: The (Kevin) Hall Effect - The Blog of Michael R. Eades, M.D.:



Have you seen the guy on the smart phone video popping up all over the internet saying he has disproven the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis of obesity? His name is Kevin Hall and he must be experiencing some real cognitive dissonance. Or I certainly am, given the sharp contrast between what his study results actually show and what he’s saying they show on the video. As we all know, cognitive dissonance occurs when we try to hold two opposing views in our mind at the same time, when we experience a disconnect between what we believe and what reality serves us up. And Hall certainly appears to have a disconnect.

The sugar conspiracy | Ian Leslie | The Guardian

The sugar conspiracy | Ian Leslie | Society | The Guardian:



The sugar conspiracy
In 1972, a British scientist sounded the alarm that sugar – and not fat – was the greatest danger to our health. But his findings were ridiculed and his reputation ruined. How did the world’s top nutrition scientists get it so wrong for so long?

Why the average ancient Roman worker was dead by 30 - The Local

Romans ate bread, had terrible health and weak bones.



Why the average ancient Roman worker was dead by 30 - The Local:



Indeed, historical evidence and tooth enamel analysis suggest that the lower echelons of Roman society subsisted on an extremely limited diet of poor quality, often rotting grains and stale bread. �

Stopping or reducing dietary fiber intake reduces constipation and its associated symptoms

Stopping or reducing dietary fiber intake reduces constipation and its associated symptoms:



CONCLUSION: Idiopathic constipation and its associated symptoms can be effectively reduced by stopping or even lowering the intake of dietary fiber.

Monday, May 23, 2016

Britain’s diabetes crisis blamed on low-fat diet craze |


Leading doctors and scientists said popular 'low fat' and 'proven to lower cholesterol' messages have had a disastrous impact on public health. 
The National Obesity Forum said it was time to 'bring back the fat' with 'real food', like steak, eggs, butter and full-fat milk.
They were essential for maintaining health and preventing diseases which cost the NHS tens of billions of pounds to treat. 

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Strong statin-diabetes link seen in large study -- ScienceDaily

Strong statin-diabetes link seen in large study -- ScienceDaily:

In a database study of nearly 26,000 beneficiaries of Tricare, the military health system, those taking statin drugs to control their cholesterol were 87 percent more likely to develop diabetes.

The study, reported online April 28, 2015, in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, confirms past findings on the link between the widely prescribed drugs and diabetes risk. But it is among the first to show the connection in a relatively healthy group of people. The study included only people who at baseline were free of heart disease, diabetes, and other severe chronic disease.

"In our study, statin use was associated with a significantly higher risk of new-onset diabetes, even in a very healthy population," says lead author Dr. Ishak Mansi. "The risk of diabetes with statins has been known, but up until now it was thought that this might be due to the fact that people who were prescribed statins had greater medical risks to begin with."

Mansi is a physician-researcher with the VA North Texas Health System and the University of Texas Southwestern in Dallas.

In the study, statin use was also associated with a "very high risk of diabetes complications," says Mansi. "This was never shown before." Among 3,351 pairs of similar patients--part of the overall study group--those patients on statins were 250 percent more likely than their non-statin-using counterparts to develop diabetes with complications.

Statin users were also 14 percent more likely to become overweight or obese after being on the drugs.

Heart attacks could be caused by too LITTLE salt new study shows | Daily Mail Online

Heart attacks could be caused by too LITTLE salt new study shows | Daily Mail Online:



Their findings showed that regardless of whether people have high blood pressure, low-salt intake is linked to a greater incidence of heart attacks, stroke, and deaths compared to average intake.

Saturday, May 14, 2016

Gluten-free diet could damage health of people without coeliac disease, expert claims

Gluten-free diet could damage health of people without coeliac disease, expert claims. http://tiny.iavian.net/a9vp

But writing in the Journal of Pediatrics, Dr Norelle Reilly, of Columbia University Medical Centre,  in New York, warned that gluten-free alternatives were often loaded with fat and sugar and lacked nutrients.

“There is no evidence that processed gluten free foods are healthier nor have there been proven health or nutritional benefits of a gluten free diet. There are no data to support the theory of intrinsically toxic properties of gluten in otherwise healthy adults and children.

“Gluten free packaged foods frequently contain a greater density of fat and sugar than their gluten-containing counterparts.

“Obesity, overweight and new-onset insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome have been identified after initiation of a gluten-free diet.

“It also may lead to deficiencies in B vitamins, folate, and iron, given a lack of nutrient fortification of many gluten-free products.”

Sunday, May 08, 2016

Children with ADHD may benefit from following healthy behaviors, new study suggests | EurekAlert! Science News

Children with ADHD may benefit from following healthy behaviors, new study suggests | EurekAlert! Science News:



Recommendations include getting no more than 1 to 2 hours of total screen time daily; getting at least 1 hour of physical activity daily; limiting consumption of sugar sweetened beverages; getting 9 to 11 hours of sleep per night; and consuming 7 to 10 cups of water daily, depending on age. Holton and Nigg created a lifestyle index to summarize the total number of healthy lifestyle behaviors adhered to by 184 children with ADHD as compared to a control group of 104 non-ADHD youth.



So kids with ADD don't have healthy behaviors, but I don't know if that necessarily means that the healthy behaviors improve ADD symptoms. 

Schizophrenia Not One Disease, New Genetic Evidence Shows

Schizophrenia Not One Disease, New Genetic Evidence Shows: Fifteen of the 48 patients (31.25%) carried rare or novel variants in one or more of the four genes, and these subgroups of patients had significantly different symptoms.

One gene is PTPRG (receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase gamma), which encodes a protein that allows nerve cells to connect as they form nerve networks. Patients with rare variants in this gene experienced earlier onset of relatively severe psychosis and had a history of learning disabilities. Despite high intelligence in some, they showed cognitive deficits in working memory, the researchers say.

Another influential gene is SLC39A13 (zinc transporter family 39 member 13). Patients with mutations in this gene also experienced early onset of schizophrenia, but they showed globally disrupted cognition and the most severe psychopathology, including negative symptoms and severe suicide attempts. They had the lowest intelligence and the least educational attainment, consistent with a developmental disorder, the researchers report.

Patients with variants in a third influential gene, ARMS/KIDINS220 (ankyrin repeat-rich membrane-spanning protein), showed early promise, and many attended college. They then experienced cognitive decline, consistent with a degenerative process.

Patients with variants in a fourth influential gene, TGM5 (transglutaminase 5), had less severe symptoms but often experienced attention-deficit disorder during childhood, and processing speed was slow in these patients.

Tuesday, May 03, 2016

New research reveals sun benefits that AREN'T linked to vitamin D | Daily Mail Online

New research reveals sun benefits that AREN'T linked to vitamin D | Daily Mail Online:



Even taking skin-cancer risk into account, scientists say the sun is healthy Research indicates it protects us against a wide range of lethal conditions. Specifically, sun exposure prompts our bodies to produce nitric oxide that helps defend our cardiovascular system

Sunday, May 01, 2016

The sugar conspiracy | Ian Leslie | Society | The Guardian

The sugar conspiracy | Ian Leslie | Society | The Guardian:

In 1972, a British scientist sounded the alarm that sugar – and not fat – was the greatest danger to our health. But his findings were ridiculed and his reputation ruined. How did the world’s top nutrition scientists get it so wrong for so long?

White bread, bagels and corn flakes 'increase the risk of lung cancer by 49%' | Daily Mail Online

White bread, bagels and corn flakes 'increase the risk of lung cancer by 49%' | Daily Mail Online: Are CARBS the new cigarettes? White bread, bagels and rice 'increase the risk of lung cancer by 49%', experts warn
Foods with high glycemic index are linked to lung cancer, scientists found
Such foods include white bread, bagels, corn flakes and puffed rice
Study found a 49% higher risk of lung cancer in people with high GI diets  Scientists recommends people cut high GI foods out of their diet

Catalyst: Ancient Teeth - ABC TV Science

Catalyst: Ancient Teeth - ABC TV Science: Scientists at the University of Adelaide have found this by analysing hundreds of skeletons dating back thousands of years. Our teeth went bad when farming began, 10,000 years ago.

Thursday, April 21, 2016

Watch What You Put In That Sippy Cup, Experts Warn

ScienceDaily: Watch What You Put In That Sippy Cup, Experts Warn

Science Daily — Juice boxes look harmless enough, with those kid-size, bendable straws and promises of 100 percent vitamin C.

As healthy as juice seems, parents need to be wary of doling out too much to children, especially during the summer when kids need plenty of fluids to stay safe, a University of Florida expert says. Unlike water and low-fat milk, fruit juices and sodas are laden with fructose, a type of naturally occurring sugar that could trigger obesity in humans.

As healthy as juice seems, parents need to be wary of doling out too much to children, especially during the summer when kids need plenty of fluids to stay safe, a University of Florida expert says. Unlike water and low-fat milk, fruit juices and sodas are laden with fructose, a type of naturally occurring sugar that could trigger obesity in humans, said Richard Johnson, MD., the J. Robert Cade professor of nephrology in the UF College of Medicine.

“Studies in humans have linked drinking excessive amounts of fruit juice and soft drinks with an increased risk for not only obesity, but also diabetes and high blood pressure,” said Johnson, also the college’s chief of nephrology, hypertension and renal transplantation. “In terms of obesity, fructose actually may set you up to not turn off your satiety response, so you will continue to eat.”

Unlike glucose, fructose does not signal the body to produce insulin, the hormone that turns sugar into energy and lets the brain know it’s time to stop eating. Fructose actually seems to do the opposite — causing resistance to insulin and blocking the “do not eat” order from making it to the brain, Johnson said.

Because fructose doesn’t stimulate insulin, consuming too much over a long period of time could trigger weight gain, said Peter Havel, Ph.D., a research endocrinologist at the University of California at Davis who studies fructose.

“If you consume fructose, it’s more like you’re consuming fat,” Havel said.

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Loneliness: The new (old) smoking?

The scourge of loneliness has been with us since time immemorial, but only in recent years has its toll on human health gained appreciation. New research shows that feeling lonely or socially isolated bumps up a person's average risk for coronary heart disease and stroke -- two of the developed world's most prolific killers -- by 50%. As a risk factor for heart attack, clogged arteries or stroke, those statistics put loneliness on a par with light smoking, anxiety and occupational stress. And they make social isolation a more powerful predictor of such vascular diseases than are either high blood pressure or obesity. Moreover, the study found, the toxic effects of loneliness strike men and women equally, researchers found. Added to research linking loneliness to higher rates of cognitive decline and poor immune system function, loneliness begins to look like a blight not just on society but on our collective well-being. http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-loneliness-heart-risk-smoking-20160419-story.html

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Why living around nature could make you live longer.

http://tiny.iavian.net/9x1l Living closer to nature is better for your health, new research suggests — and may even extend your life.

study just published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives found that people who live in “greener” areas, with more vegetation around, have a lower risk of mortality. The health benefits are likely thanks to factors such as improved mental health, social engagement and physical activity that come with living near green spaces.

Why Facebook gave the boot to The Shade room

"Reminder: Facebook can take down your 4.4 million-like page anytime it wants without explanation," Nieman Lab's Joshua Benton tweeted on Monday.

Benton's colleague, Laura Hazard Owen, suggested that "the takedown of such a large and popular page could add fuel to concerns that publishers are giving Facebook too much power."

. http://tiny.iavian.net/9x5m

Sunday, April 17, 2016

Students are struggling to read entire books

Lizzy Kelly, a history student at Sheffield added: “Students might be more inclined to read what academics want them to if our curricula weren’t overwhelmingly white, male and indicative of a society and structures we fundamentally disagree with because they don't work for us.”

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/university-students-are-struggling-to-read-entire-books-a6986361.html

Thursday, April 14, 2016

Sugar addiction like drug abuse, study reveals

Scientists have discovered drugs used to treat nicotine addiction could be used to treat sugar addiction. In the study carried out by Australia's Queensland University (QUT), it compared the effects of sugar to those of cocaine and likened the symptoms of coming off it to going 'cold turkey'. “Like other drugs of abuse, withdrawal from chronic sucrose exposure can result in an imbalance in dopamine levels and be as difficult as going ‘cold turkey’ from them.” Masroor Shariff Neuroscientist Professor Selena http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/04/13/sugar-addiction-like-drug-abuse-study-reveals/

Saturday, October 31, 2015

Obese children's health rapidly improves with sugar reduction unrelated to calories Study indicates that calories are not created equal; sugar and fructose are dangerous

Obese children's health rapidly improves with sugar reduction unrelated to calories Study indicates that calories are not created equal; sugar and fructose are dangerous Reducing consumption of added sugar, even without reducing calories or losing weight, has the power to reverse a cluster of chronic metabolic diseases, including high cholesterol and blood pressure, in children in as little as 10 days, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco and Touro University California. "This study definitively shows that sugar is metabolically harmful not because of its calories or its effects on weight; rather sugar is metabolically harmful because it's sugar," said lead author Robert Lustig, MD, MSL, pediatric endocrinologist at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital San Francisco. "This internally controlled intervention study is a solid indication that sugar contributes to metabolic syndrome, and is the strongest evidence to date that the negative effects of sugar are not because of calories or obesity." Jean-Marc Schwarz, PhD of the College of Osteopathic Medicine at Touro University California and senior author of the paper added, "I have never seen results as striking or significant in our human studies; after only nine days of fructose restriction, the results are dramatic and consistent from subject to subject. These findings support the idea that it is essential for parents to evaluate sugar intake and to be mindful of the health effects of what their children are consuming."